Mothers Making a Living in EC420

Compassion Project EC420, Darwin’s Project, is fortunate to house not only a Child Sponsorship Program but also a Child Survival Program. The Child Survival Program is much like a prequel to the Sponsorship Program, educating the mother or primary caregiver, before and after her child is born, about providing critical care during the earliest years. What’s more, the program teaches the moms a trade skill, empowering them to earn additional income and support their families.

MomCrafterEC420

Let me tell you, these ladies are talented. The beautiful mother pictured above, she made that scarf I’m wearing.

GoodsforSalein420

And that’s not all she can do. The ladies also knit child-sized sweaters; string beautiful beaded necklaces and earrings; crochet handbags, ponchos, and scarves; create their own shampoos, and sew fleece child-sized pant sets, printed fleece blankets, and fleece scarves.

2GoodsforSalein420

Ready for the shocker? The shampoos are $1 per bottle. The ponchos are $5. The earrings are $0.50 a pair. The necklaces? $1-$2. Seriously. All of that time, all of that effort – $5. But you know what? That $5 might mean her family gets meat at their meal, a toothbrush for each member, warm blankets for the baby, or so much more that we take for granted everyday.

sewingroom420In this way, Compassion is not only providing the mothers with essential Early Childhood Development Education, they are providing tangible ways for the mothers to take charge of their own situations – all while sharing hope and love through spiritual teaching and faith-based learning.

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DarwinSmWant to help a family in EC420? Darwin is still looking for a sponsor. I have his packet until Friday – let me know if you’d like more information and I’ll happily answer any questions I can. Interested in sponsoring a Mother and Child? Click here to read more about Compassion’s Child Survival Program.

 

 

‘Till the Storm Passes By

In the dark of the midnight, have I oft hid my face; while the storm howls above me and there's no hiding place. Mid the crash of the thunder, precious Lord hear my cry. Keep me safe 'till the storm passes by.

'Till the storm passes over, 'till the thunder sounds no more, 'till the clouds roll forever from the sky; hold me fast, let me stand in the hollow of thy hand. Keep me safe 'till the storm passes by.

When the long night has ended and the storms come no more let me stand in thy pressence on that bright peaceful shore. In that land where the tempest never comes, Lord may I dwell with thee 'till the storm passes by.

Till the storm passes over, till the thunder sounds no more, till the clouds roll forever from the sky; hold me fast, let me stand in the hollow of thy hand keep me safe till the storm passes by.

Many times Satan tells me there is no need to try, for there is no end of sorrow there's no hope by and by; but I no thou art with me, and tomorrow I'll rise where the storms never darken the skies

Till the storm passes over, till the thunder sounds no more, till the clouds roll forever from the sky; hold me fast, let me stand in the hollow of thy hand keep me safe till the storm passes by.

Keep me safe till the storm passes by.

(“'Till the Storm Passes By” Words and Music by Mosie Lister; copyright 1958)

Praying for all those affected by this week's terrible storms.

Looking for ways to help those in Oklahoma?

  • Text FOOD to 32333 to donate $10 to the OKC food bank
  • Text REDCROSS to 90999 to give $10 to disaster relief
  • Text “STORM” to 80888 to make $10 donation through the Salvation Army

 

Five Minute Friday: Making A Difference Together

I’m joining the Gypsy Mama and her Five Minute Fridays. Rules are: for only five short, bold, beautiful minutes. Unscripted and unedited. We just write without worrying if it’s just right or not. Won’t you join us?

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Earlier this week I received an email from Compassion. Thankfully it was not relating to my sponsored children (2 of which live in flood declared disaster areas of Equador), but instead, was a response to my advocate application that I had turned in last Fall.

It had been so long since I sent it that I had actually come to the conclusion that it just wasn’t mean to be forgotten about it. But, nope, they wanted to set up a phone interview with me and have me watch/review some training webcasts.

No problem-o, Bob. I quickly scheduled my interview (for this afternoon) and set out to watch the videos.

And amid all of that, I realized that Compassion Bloggers would be making a trip to Tanzania soon, Compassion Sunday events are being held all over North America, and even something as small as this blog is impacting sponsors and potential sponsors around the world.

You. Me. Our neighbors, our families – all connected and making a difference in this world – together.

Some of us will make a difference locally – helping a student struggling with school work, stocking a community food pantry, shopping a locally owned businesses, simply sharing a smile

Some of us will make a difference regionally – volunteering in afterschool programs, leading church groups/classes, hosting in(RL) link-ups, supporting farmer’s markets, offering to carpool when someone needs transportation

Some of us will make a difference globally – growing our own food, supporting missionaries, participating in Operation Christmas Child.

But there is one way to make a difference at ALL levels – Sponsor a child in poverty. When you sponsor a child, you not only make a global impact, but you also impact regions and local communities. Your sponsorship directly provides for benefits that an impoverished child would otherwise be unable to obtain: education, healthcare, self-worth. You also provide benefits to that child’s family and community. You’re directly growing regional and global leaders. Compassion sponsored children have gone on to serve in their countries’ supreme courts and legislative bodies, changing standards and situations for children across the world.Not to mention how, if you let it, sponsorship can change you. For a little over $1 a day, you come to find that a cream-colored envelope in your mailbox is one of the world’s best hidden delights. You suddenly find yourself more globally-aware; “where was that earthquake on the news? Not near my child- I hope.” And, if you’re like me, you find a renewed passion and sense of purpose.And, if you already sponsor, there’s a small person, many miles away who anxiously waits to hear from YOU. Your words, your letters, your love, means more to them than any amount of money.And so,Together, we CAN make a difference. One child at a time.

If you haven’t already, I urge you to check into Compassion or World-Vision and sponsor a child today.I you already sponsor, I urge you to take 5 minutes and send up a prayer for your sponsored child and their family. Drop them a postcard in the mail; send a letter; a hug; some love. Let them know you care.Who knows, you might just find a beautiful photo like this one waiting in your mailbox one day:

Emily and Her Family

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5 Ways Compassion Could Help You Survive a Zombie Outbreak

Compassion Defined: a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken by misfortune, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate the suffering.

Go ahead and laugh, you know you want to – after all, it would appear that logic and reasoning would tell us that compassion would be the one thing that would, without fail, lead to our demise during a zombie outbreak. And yet, I say that’s not the case. So, if you’ll bear with me, I’d like to point out 5 ways compassion could help you survive a zombie outbreak.

1) Protect a Friend- While it could be done, traveling alone during a Zombie Outbreak is not reccomended. You’re going to need a group, preferably a diverse group with lots of skills. But what’s most important, is that you need a group of people that, if need be, would come to your rescue. Further, you need to be willing to rescue members of your group. Just remember, rescue comes in all forms from fighting off attacking zombies to simply sharing a smile. And please, learn to recognize when it’s time to call for reinforcements – not all battles can be won alone.

2) Stock the Food Bank – Just where, exactly, do you think you’re going to find food during a zombie outbreak? Grocery stores will be quickly ravaged and home sources will spoil or be used at an uncanny rate. Ignore that twinkie factory – don’t you know, they actually do expire. My suggestion, scout out your local food bank. Better yet, scout out several. Your city may run a food bank, but so do lots of churches. Get to know where these sources are, and, better still, start contributing to them now to ensure they are well stocked with all of your favorite foods when the time comes.

3) Help out at a Suitable Shelter – Just like with food, you’re going to need adequate shelter during a zombie attack – preferably a strong building with few windows and fortress like appeal. Where can you find such a building? Ummm, Hello, What did the churches with the food banks look like? Duh! Perfect shelter! While several church have large windows, many are almost castle-like in their construction. Better still, find a church in tornado alley – those suckers are built to withstand anything!  When you start contributing to the food banks, why not scout out the church that is the best candidate for suitable shelter and get to know the people there. If you go about it the right way, you might be able to get your small group, food, and shelter all at the same place! AND, if you get active in said church by, I don’t know, teaching a children’s class or leading the singing, they might even give you a key to the building! Perfect!! You wouldn’t even need to break into the shelter, you could just walk-in and lock the door behind you!

4) Donate Time or Supplies to a Local Medical Facility – Like it or not, there will come a point in the zombie outbreak that you will need medical attention. Stay away from large hospitals – they’re like magnets for zombies: lots of people who cannot run away. Yea, not where I’d want to go for help during an outbreak. Instead, like the food banks, start scouting out your local health clinic. These are often in less affluent parts of town, and, while not as fancy, should have all the supplies you’ll need. You did include a medically trained person in your small group, right? If not, many community clinics utilize volunteer help – give some of your time now and volunteer. They’ll teach you tons of basic medical training that will be invaluable during an outbreak. You should also check in on your identified clinic on a regular basis – make sure they have all the supplies you’re going to need, and donate to them when you can. That way, you’ll be certain to have a good supply of medical necessities on hand during a zombie outbreak.

5) Care for Humanity – Above all, never lose your humanity. As Chris Abani puts it, “There is no way for us to be human without other people.” This sort of goes back to the small group thing, we cannot survive alone. Therefore, you must invest in humanity while you can. Show kindness to strangers, be nice, help out your neighbor and all that business. You never know when you might need to rely on that person to be your lookout while you go to the bathroom (one of the most vulnerable places you’ll have to go during a zombie outbreak) And, who knows, maybe Mr. Godfrey will remember that time you helped him rake his yard and be kind enough to return the favor and offer you security in his air raid shelter, or let you share his leftover food from that Y2K scare a few years back. Like I said, never underestimate humanity.

 

Well, as you can see, these 5 acts of compassion could very well save your life during a zombie outbreak. So, what are you waiting for? Get going! Do what you can to prepare now, for you never know when the day will come!

Comments regarding additional ways compassion can save you during a zombie outbreak are more than welcome. As for me, I’m off to stock that food bank with lots of sour gummy worms and cheesy rits crackers!

 

*zombie drawing courtesy of dzingeek‘s flickr.